Homeowner credits pit bull for saving his life during attempted robbery in Kansas City

KANSAS CITY, Mo.
November 21, 2015

A pit bull is being credited this week with defending a homeowner during an attempted robbery in Kansas City, Mo.

The homeowner says the pit bull, named “Blue,” defended the home during a robbery attempt Thursday on the 2000 block of E. 82nd Street.

Read the whole story here: http://www.kshb.com/news/local-news/homeowner-credits-pit-bull-for-saving-his-life-during-attempted-robbery-in-kansas-city

Boonville, Missouri Overturns BSL After 18 Years

    • Mayor breaks tie on new dangerous dog ordinance

  • Boonville Mayor Julie Thacher’s vote broke the tie (four to four) to ultimately approve the new dangerous dog ordinance, which releases a ban on pit bulls in Boonville.
    • By Edward Lang, Managing Editor
    • Posted Jul. 21, 2015 at 12:01 AM
      Updated Jul 21, 2015 at 10:51 AM

Boonville Mayor Julie Thacher’s vote broke the tie (four to four) to ultimately approve the new dangerous dog ordinance, which releases a ban on pit bulls in Boonville.Several individuals who were in favor of the removal of breed specific legislation told the council reasons for this favor at the council meeting Monday evening. Individuals representing the Great Plains SPCA said they were asked to come to support local animal advocates. They also said they believe that environment rather than breed is a factor in behavior development.Boonville resident Mike Kelley said he wanted the council to keep the ban on pit bulls, which he believed would be the right thing to do.

An amendment by Boonville Ward Four Councilman Mark Livingston added that any animal taken from the owner could be given to a non-for-profit state licensed rescue organization. He also added language that prohibited any dog that showed signs of aggressive behavior towards a human or a domesticated animal. The amendment passed, seven to one (Boonville Ward Four Councilman Henry Hurt voted against).

“I don’t normally get calls, but I have gotten calls about this subject. People want us to keep pit bulls out of Boonville,” Hurt said. “I know there are people who have pit bulls in town. I see them all the time. If these people are not going to do what is legal now, are they going to do what is legal when we say it is okay for them to have these dogs?”

After a failed attempt to re-insititue the pit bull ban into the ordinance by Boonville Ward One Councilman Steve Young, the ordinance went for a final council vote.

Boonville Ward Two Councilwoman Vanessa Dorman, Boonville Ward One Councilwoman Kari Evans, Young and Hurt voted against.

Boonville Ward Two Councilwoman Susan Meadows, Boonville Ward Three Councilman Ned Beach, Boonville Ward Four Councilman Mark Livingston and Boonville Ward Three Councilwoman Becky Ehlers voted in favor of the ordinance.

The tie was broken by Thacher as she voted in favor of the ordinance.

The ordinance, according to city officials, holds the dog owner more accountable than previously. A new tethered law is also enacted, which states a dog cannot be on a tether for more than 11 hours.

Animal advocates from the SPCA and other organizations believe this new ordinance will make it more manageable for Boonville Animal Control Officer Pam Paxton.

The council also voted to approve the new animal control administrative fees.

The new ordinance defines a vicious dog as any animal that has caused death or serious injury to a person. It is also defined because of size, physical characteristics  and vicious propensities of being capable of inflicting serious physical injury. Animals that have been trained to fight or is kept for the purpose of fighting are also prohibited.  The complete ordinance can be reviewed by picking up a copy at Boonville City Hall on Main Street.

What They Should Have Told Me When I Rescued My Pit Bull

They said, “He’s strong, about 67 pounds, and he’s a puller but with some training he’ll be great.” Okay, I thought. Easy enough. But what they should have told me was something entirely different. What they should have told me was this:

This is an adventure.

Welcome to the best years of your life.

Read article here

Pit Bull Bans Disappearing

Firefighters needed an ax and a pike pole to pry the snarling pit bull off of 71-year-old Jimmie Mae McConnell’s torn and bloody body.

That fatal dog attack in 2006 led to calls for tougher enforcement of the now-24-year-old pit bull ban in Kansas City, Kan., while prompting other area cities to tighten their restrictions on a breed known for its muscular build and savage bite.

Yet thanks to research that shows little correlation between fatal dog bites and the breeds of the dogs inflicting those wounds, the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kan., is now considering what would have been unthinkable a few years ago.

Unified Government commissioners this month will take up a comprehensive animal-control ordinance that repeals the ban on pit bulls.
Instead, the proposed policy would impose new rules and restrictions aimed at preventing dog attacks without regard to breed by focusing on the behavior of animal owners and their pets.

Read more here: In a quiet trend …

Roeland Park considers lifting pit bull ban

ROELAND PARK, KS (KCTV) – September 23, 2014

The city of Roeland Park is considering becoming the latest area municipality to lift its pit bull ban. Some council members believe it makes more sense to have a ban on dangerous animals rather than a breed specific ban.

In January, Bonner Springs lifted its pit bull ban. Kansas City allows pit bulls, but they have to be spayed or neutered. Independence and Kansas City, KS ban the dogs. Kellie Maschmeyer hopes Roeland Park joins the effort to outlaw the bans. She had to give up her 4-year-old dog, Chloe, when she moved to Roeland Park in February because of the pit bull ban. “I was horrified because we had been looking at other places to live and most of them don’t have the pit ban,” she said. “(Giving up Chloe) was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do.” Maschmeyer, who had owned Chloe since she was 11 weeks old, said pit bull owners are not a danger to society and deserve to have their dogs. She said she’s been bitten by a boxer and border collie.

Councilwoman Jennifer Gunby proposed lifting the breed specific restriction, which has been on the books since the late 1980s.

Michael Berney, who owns a golden retriever and a lab, supports the ordinance change. He said it’s more important to focus on specific dogs with issues rather than a specific breed. “I think when you pick on one breed it’s going to make their image look a lot worse,” Berney said. “If you raise them mean, they’ll be mean no matter what kind of breed they are.”

Opponents of the ban say even little dogs can be dangerous.

A council committee could discuss the change on Oct. 6 and then the council vote the following week. The proposal includes other changes to the city’s regulations of dogs and would adopt feral cat language. Currently, anyone in Roeland Park with an American pit bull, American Staffordshire terrier or Staffordshire bull terrier face a fine of $200 to $500 and up to 30 days in jail. Each day is considered a separate violation. The city will also impound any pit bulls.

Copyright 2014 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) All rights reserved

Read complete article here

Additional links:

Bonner Springs reviewing ordinance after family dog seized
Bonner Springs lifts ban
Wellsville considers lifting ban

Attitudes and Laws Against Pit Bulls Soften

March 11, 2014
By BILL DRAPER
Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — For much of the past three decades, pit bulls have been widely regarded as America’s most dangerous dog — the favorite breed of thugs, drug dealers and dog-fighting rings, with a fearsome reputation for unprovoked, sometimes deadly attacks.

Hostility toward “pits” grew so intense that some cities began treating them as the canine equivalent of assault rifles and prohibited residents from owning them.

But attitudes have softened considerably since then as animal activists and even television shows cast the dogs in a more positive light. The image makeover has prompted many states to pass new laws that forbid communities from banning specific breeds. And it illustrates the power and persistence of dog-advocacy groups that have worked to fend off pit bull restrictions with much the same zeal as gun-rights groups have defeated gun-control measures.

Full article

Dogfighting Victims Rescued by MABBR Need YOUR Support!

Photo by ASPCA

Photo by ASPCA

Last August, the second-largest dogfighting bust in United States history resulted in the seizure of 367 dogs. This is an ongoing federal case, you can read more about it here:

Though we still have two dogs available for adoption that came to us from a bust last spring (Tex and Heidi), MABBR committed to taking yet another bust victim into our program despite being full. (We will be posting BeeGee’s adoption info soon after she is evaluated and settles in).

BeeGee1In order for us to continue to help dogs seized in busts, as well as dogs that end up in area shelters, we desperately need YOUR help! Your donation will be used to help feed, vet, and house these deserving dogs until they are adopted into loving homes.

In addition to donations, we will also be posting an Amazon Wish List, too!

Please make a donation today. We appreciate your support!

Loyal Pit Bull Acts as Seeing Eye Dog for Brother

Huff Post Good News 11/18/13

Pictures are worth a thousand words, but this one might just leave you speechless. Earlier we posted a picture of Jeffrey, who is blind, and his brother Jermaine, who has dedicated his life to be Jeffrey’s loyal guide dog. Here they are as they sleep, holding on to each other. The unconditional love and devotion these two dogs show is positively inspirational. Jeffrey and Jermaine are STILL waiting at shelter Operation Ava in Philadelphia for their hero to come rescue them! Please open your heart and home to them! For more information or adoption inquiries, please contact Operation Ava at (215) 240-1240 or visit their website www.operationava.org.

Read story here

The Bombshells Donate to MABBR

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Two KCK men charged in three-state dogfighting case

March 25, 2013

By TONY RIZZO

The Kansas City Star

Federal prosecutors have charged two Kansas City, Kan., men with participating in a three-state Midwest dogfighting ring that was broken up Saturday at a fight in Texas.  Federal officials have broken up a three-state dogfighting ring that they say trained some dogs on treadmills in Kansas City, Kan. U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom (center) spoke about the charges during a press conference Monday at the federal courthouse in Kansas City, Kan.

Federal officials have broken up a three-state Midwest dog-fighting ring that they say trained some dogs on treadmills in Kansas City, Kan.  Authorities seized 71 dogs, most of them pit bulls, over the weekend in Kansas, Missouri and Texas, said Barry Grissom, the U.S. attorney for Kansas.  Among the sites searched were a Kansas City, Kan., residence — where some dogs allegedly were trained using treadmills and caged chickens — and a northern Missouri farm owned by one of the suspects, authorities said.

Pete Davis Jr., 38, and Melvin L. Robinson, 41, are charged in U.S. District Court in Kansas City, Kan., with transporting dogs in interstate commerce to participate in animal fighting. If convicted, each man faces up to five years in federal prison.  The two men owned as many as 60 dogs that were kept mainly at the farm in Harrison County, Mo., where fights were held on Sundays, according to court documents unsealed Monday.

Medical teams from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals are caring for the seized dogs and six rescued chickens , authorities said Monday.  Staff from Wayside Waifs in Kansas City and Great Plains SPCA in Merriam are helping with operations to care for the animals in a temporary shelter, ASPCA officials said.

“Dogfighting is not a sport. It is a crime,” Grissom said at a Monday afternoon news conference.  The charges and animal rescues were the result of a five-month investigation by federal, state and local law enforcement officers and the ASPCA, Grissom said. He said that partnership showed that authorities take the crime very seriously.

“We hope this will send a message,” Grissom said. “This kind of behavior has to stop.”

According to the allegations, Robinson used treadmills and weights to train the dogs, which sometimes killed chickens in the exercises.  A plywood box kept the dogs on the treadmills and Robinson allegedly would place a harnesses on the dogs and chain the harnesses to the treadmills for hours at a time.  Davis, Robinson and a third person allegedly removed two dead dogs from the farm this month and disposed of them in Kansas.  Witnesses told investigators that Robinson and Davis discussed traveling to Texas in late March for a large “dog show,” which is code for dogfight, federal investigators said.  Robinson and Davis also talked about plans to wager $20,000 to $30,000 on the fights, according to the documents.

On Friday, law enforcement officers followed the pair and several other people traveling in a three-vehicle convoy through Oklahoma and into Texas to a location near Tyler.  At Monday’s news conference, authorities said about 30 people were attending the fight Saturday night in a wooded area when police moved in.  One of the Kansas City, Kan., men was arrested there, but authorities did not say which one.  The other man turned himself in to authorities in Kansas.  Many people attending the fight fled when police arrived. “Like cockroaches when the lights are turned on,” Grissom said.

A similar joint investigation in 2009 that centered on northwest Missouri broke the largest U.S. dogfighting ring, involving more than 400 dogs. Though the case announced Monday was not as large, it still was a significant operation, said Tim Rickey, the vice president of the ASCPA’s field investigations and response team.

Rickey said the animals’ health is being assessed while they are held as evidence in the criminal cases.  The goal is to rehabilitate as many of the dogs as possible and prepare them for adoption, he said.  “In our eyes,these dogs have suffered tremendously as a result of this for-profit crime,” he said. “We want to give these dogs a second chance.”  Despite the disruption of two major operations in the area since 2009, dogfighting remains prevalent, Rickey said.  “My goal — our goal — is to put an end to this brutal and barbaric industry,” he said.

See video.

To reach Tony Rizzo, call 816-234-4435 or send email to trizzo@kcstar.com.